Thursday, January 25, 2007

Quote of the Day

Speaking of conversion, Beliefnet's got up a snip of a 1964 Joseph Ratzinger sermon on the salvation of non-Christians, taken from the recently-translated What It Means to be a Christian, published by Ignatius. The Benedictine thread of "It's not them, it's us" is clearly visible 41 years before the conciliar peritus ascended Peter's chair.

Key, quasi-prophetic part:
We are staring at the trials of everyday Christianity and forgetting on that account that faith is not just a burden that weighs us down; it is at the same time a light that brings us counsel, gives us a path to follow, and gives us meaning. We are seeing in the Church only the exterior order that limits our freedom and thereby overlooking the fact that she is our spiritual home, which shields us, keeps us safe in life and in death. We are seeing only our own burden and forgetting that other people also have burdens, even if we know nothing of them. And above all, what a strange attitude that actually is, when we no longer find Christian service worthwhile if the denarius of salvation may be obtained even without it! It seems as if we want to be rewarded, not just with our own salvation, but most especially with other people's damnation—just like the workers hired in the first hour. That is very human, but the Lord's parable is particularly meant to make us quite aware of how profoundly un-Christian it is at the same time. Anyone who looks on the loss of salvation for others as the condition, as it were, on which he serves Christ will in the end only be able to turn away grumbling, because that kind of reward is contrary to the loving-kindness of God.